From weakness to benefits, Chinese women adapt fast to America

By Yiping Yang

4/29/2013

For Chinese women, travelling a few thousand miles to the United States has been a big adventure for them. Upon arriving, they may have to face loneliness, isolation from their main culture and challenges of making a living. But for some of them, they welcome the different culture and the chance to find their own ways of dealing with every problem.

Tian treats her foreign experiences as a skill

Lucia Tian is currently a graduate student at Harvard University. She left China when she was 4 years old. Before she came to the United States, Tian lived in Germany, France and Canada with her parents. Her traveling used to make her feel rootless, but now she treats the experience as a treasure.

Hao set up her career and family all in America

Hailey Hao is now an educational access coordinator for Malden Access TV. Back in China, she graduated from Sichuan University with a major in tourism management. She was also an anchor of a TV show introducing Chinese culture to Americans. However, she left all this behind and pursued a TV production major at Boston University in 2004 when she was 23. She is proud of her Chinese background.

Chinese women students at Boston College seek better opportunities 

Like Lucia Tian and Hailey Hao, a large number of Chinese women come to the U.S. for better education and living opportunities.

The Institute of International Education said in 2012 most of the international students,around 6 ¬†out of every 10, studying at the U.S. colleges and universities came from Asian countries. It notes the growth in these numbers can be attributed to larger numbers o of students from China. China had the most international students in 2012, nearly 200,000. According to American Community Survey data, the population of women who were international students in college or universities in the U.S. outnumbered men in 2008 and continues through today. The U.S. Census Bureau’s American Community Survey says Chinese-born women were more likely than Chinese-born men and immigrant men and women overall to work in management, business, and finance professions in 2010.

Boston College in Massachusetts has approximately 1,700 international students from over 90 countries. But the number of Chinese students has increased rapidly in a decade and Chinese students represents the largest percentage of international students.

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Alice Luo

Alice Luo is an undergraduate student in Boston College. She is grateful for her life in America where she has been encouraged to be herself.

 

Yezi Xu

Yezi Xu came to the United States last year for a one-year graduate program in Boston College. She began looking for jobs in America as soon as she settled in. The process was hard for international students like her, but finally she got one offer in New York.

About Yiping Yang 4 Articles
Yiping Yang came to America two years ago and seeking to be an international journalist. She works at the WEBN Boston news station and has set up a new Chinese channel with her team. She is also volunteering in a non-profit organization called National Association of Asian American Professionals. She also loves video production, having made three short-form documentaries in the U.S. For her, life in America is full of adventure and she enjoys it.